Sheldon Solomon is an American Social psychologist. He is a professor at Skidmore College. He has appeared in many movies, documentaries, and radio shows.

He is the author of several books and co-author of researched papers on the sense of Human Mortality and Neuron patterns.

“We are, from a purely biological perspective, simply breathing pieces of defecating meat, no more significant or enduring than a lizard or a potato.”

Sheldon Solomon

His famous book was ”The Worm at the Core: On the Role of Death in Life.

According to Sheldon, the meaning of life is to create one. We have the full privilege of giving meaning to ourselves. We must take care of others and ourselves. Serving others in their needs should be a priority in our life.

His perspective towards life has always been fragile. He always refers that we species are not the powerful ones, We are the same likes other species, the only difference is we have the Intelligence to think and we should never misuse our Intelligence.

Meaning-of-life-Sheldon-Solomon

“If you can afford the finer things in life, people pay attention to you. You feel special. Your self-esteem, that critical bulwark against the fear of death, rises.”

Sheldon Solomon
About- Sheldon expresses his view on the meaning of life. Being compassionate, humble, and kind to everyone is the meaning of life. Whatever we achieve, show or gain intelligence has no meaning if we don’t have humbleness in us.

“Although we typically take our cultural worldview for granted, it is actually a fragile human construction that people spend great energy creating, maintaining, and defending. Since we’re constantly on the brink of realizing that our existence is precarious, we cling to our culture’s governmental, educational, and religious institutions and rituals to buttress our view of human life as uniquely significant and eternal.”

Sheldon Solomon
About – Sheldon from his experience, Religion is evolutionary acceptance. It can play both roles of diseases and cure. The original concept of Religion was to bind people together for goodwill and have moral support for each other.

“Through diligent efforts to become familiar with the prospect (and the inevitable fact) of dying, one ideally becomes psychologically fortified to the point where, as Montaigne put it, “I am at all hours as well prepared as I am ever like to be, and death, whenever he shall come, can bring nothing along with him I did not expect long before.” Thus encouraged, Montaigne can agree with Lucretius’ counsel: “Why not depart from life as a sated guest from a feast?”

Sheldon Solomon

“Our longing to transcend death inflames violence toward each other.”

Sheldon Solomon

“This realization threatens to put us in a persistent state of existential fear.”

Sheldon Solomon

“We can reflect on the fact that each of us is, in Otto Rank’s lovely words, a “temporal representative.”

Sheldon Solomon

“We know, if only vaguely and inchoately, that our finest and most memorable experiences may never, and indeed, ultimately will never, happen again. That is why we cherish them so.”

Sheldon Solomon

“If you can afford the finer things in life, people pay attention to you. You feel special. Your self-esteem, that critical bulwark against the fear of death, rises.”

Sheldon Solomon